Woorim Beach, Bribie Island Foreshore Rehabilitation and Maintenance

Woorim Beach, Bribie Island Foreshore Rehabilitation and Maintenance

 

Rehabilitating Woorim Beach dunes and improving habitat quality and integrity.

 

Woorim beach bribie island foreshore rehabilitationWork to protect the oldest freshwater fish in the country also helps the quality of the major source of drinking water.

Rehabilitating Woorim Beach dunes and improving habitat quality and integrity.

Healthy Land & Water’s Woorim Foreshore Rehabilitation and Maintenance Project is meant to improve the habitat quality and integrity of Woorim Beach in Bribie Island over three years.

The project aims to rehabilitate two hectares annually of dunes by undertaking weed control and enrichment planting. Those initiatives are meant to stabilise the sand deposited by a sand back passing system as part of Moreton Bay Regional Council erosion management works.

 

The sand backing system pumps sand from the southern end of the island back to Woodrim Beach to secure critical turtle nesting sites.

 

What we are doing

Woorim Beach Bribie IslandWoorim Beach, Bribie Island

This project involved 3 years of effort to secure the beaches on Bribie Island from extreme sand erosion.

The rehabilitation process includes:

  • Remove weeds across 2ha annually to prevent fire hazard buildup and leave open space for native flora and fauna to thrive.
  • Revegetation and enrichment planting on 2ha annually to secure the cleared soils and sand.
  • Stabilise sand deposited by a sand back passing system as part of Moreton Bay Regional Council management works.

 

Measuring success

  • Improving the ecological functioning of this important habitat of the Moreton Bay Ramsar Wetland.
  • Rehabilitate Woorim dunes.
  • Targeting weed control and enrichment planting.

 

Why this project is important

The southeastern section of Bribie Island in the Moreton Bay Ramsar Wetland has experienced significant erosion over the past decade from natural events combined with a sand budget deficit.

The loss of dune and vegetation has repercussions on the wildlife as well, discouraging endangered loggerhead turtles from nesting along this section, as they have done historically.

To counter this, a sand back-passing system has been planned and implemented to renourish the Woorim Beach section. To stabilise this sand, dune rehabilitation through ongoing weed control and enrichment planting with appropriate native species is imperative.

  

Project snapshot

Project name: Woorim Foreshore Rehabilitation and Maintenance Project
Project manager: Chelsea Kluske
Catchment: Bribie Island
Timing: Dec 2020 – Jun 2023 (Completed)
Budget: $22,500
Partnerships:

This project is supported by Healthy Land & Water, through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

This project is being delivered in partnership with Bribie Island Environment Protection Association.

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What's next

There is huge potential to build on the successful work.

 

Project collaborators

This dune rehabilitation project forms part of Bribie Island Environment Protections Association's Beach Protection initiatives.

 This project is supported by Healthy Land & Water, through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

 australian government rural landcare program rlp