Achieving impact

Resilient Rivers

Resilient Rivers

 

Reducing soil erosion by implementing engineered and revegetation solutions.

 

gully repair with logs and stonesGully and streambank initiatives to control erosion and improve water quality by reducing sediment and turbidity in the waterways.The focus of this project was to reduce soil erosion by implementing engineered and revegetation solutions to control gully retreat and bank scour near and in the Bremer River.

The program started in 2010, delivers stream bank and gully stabilisation projects in areas identified as contributing high sediment loads to Ramsar-listed Moreton Bay.

Gully and streambank initiatives control erosion and improve bank stability and water quality by reducing sediment and turbidity in waterways.

The project focused on:

  • Gully repair and support of Healthy Catchments Program.
  • Design and installation of the engineered and revegetation solutions at properties within the Bremer Catchment.
  • Reducing sediment and improving water quality.
  • Protecting agricultural land and environmental values by reducing gully and streambank erosion.
  • Improving community flood resilience.

The Resilient Rivers project is part of the Healthy Catchments program.

 

What we did

map of works for BenstedImplementing best practice technologies for instream bank rehabilitation projects.

This project  involved:

  • Gully repair and support of Healthy Catchments Program.
  • Support the design and installation of the engineered and revegetation solutions at properties within the Bremer Catchment.
  • Implementation of best practice technologies for instream bank rehabilitation projects.
  • Application of the revegetation principles outlined in the South East Queensland Ecological Framework for project delivery and engagement to ensure consistent and sustainable project outcomes.

 

Measuring success

As a result of the program, the following has been achieved:

  • Design and repair of a gully on one designated property.
  • Stabilisation of two key locations along the gully.
  • Stabilisation of several gully heads by drowning them out with a leaky weir.
  • Construction of an armoured bypass to safely convey the water down to the gully floor.
  • Stabilisation and reparation of a crossing, which was undermining the access road.

 

Why this project is important

Streambank and gully erosion is a major source of sediment entering our waterways and previous studies have identified the Upper Warrill, Upper Bremer, and Upper Laidley catchments as contributing high sediment loads to Moreton Bay.

Accordingly, several projects, including this one, have focused on gully and in-stream bank stabilisation to reduce sediment and improve water quality.

Keeping sediment in the landscape and slowing the water flow in the upper catchments, prevents it from being mobilised into waterways, endangering the ecosystems downstream.

Reducing streambank and gully erosion protects productive agricultural land and, through targeted vegetation planting, can also increase bank stabilisation, rain infiltration, reduce surface runoff and provide a stable area for sediment deposition, improving environmental outcomes for landholders as well as flood resilience.  

 

Project snapshot

Project name:  Healthy Catchments - Resilient Rivers Initiative
Project manager:  Samille Loch-Wilkinson, Healthy Land & Water
Catchment:  Bensted
Timing: 2022 (Completed)
Budget: $10,000
Partnerships: 

This project is supported by Healthy Land & Water, through funding from Resilient Rivers Initiative (signatories include the Council of Mayors - SEQ, the Queensland Government, Seqwater, Healthy Land & Water, Unitywater and Queensland Urban Utilities) and the Scenic Rim Council.

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What's next

There is huge potential to build on the successful work.

 

Project collaborators

This project is supported by Healthy Land & Water, through funding from the Resilient Rivers Initiative (signatories include the Council of Mayors - SEQ, the Queensland Government, Seqwater, Healthy Land & Water, Unitywater, and Queensland Urban Utilities) and the Scenic Rim Council.

 Scenic Rim Regional Council logo